About your Search

20130104
20130112
STATION
CSPAN 57
LANGUAGE
English 57
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)
are the numbers to use if you are a student or a graduate. -- you are a parent, - use for educators and administrators, the number is -- please make sure you meet thae - mute the tv when you call in. hasg tag, @cspan. our facebook poll has been up for a number of hours. you can go to facebook.com/c- span. is college worth going into debt? let's go to new york and hear from marian wang. she is the education reporter for propublica joining us byvia skype. >> thank you for having me. >> what got you interested in the area of student debt? >> there are record numbers for student debt. i began covering education. i got sucked into it. so much is happening in that space. there are hard economic times that is putting an extra crunch on students and families at a time and college costs keep rising. >> we showed audiences the -- the conversation you participated in a couple of months ago. the scope of the issue and the size of the student debt that we are dealing with these days. >> the government issued more than a hundred billion dollars in student loans to families and grad students and p
year from elsewhere to kick their education here and who may want to stay here and have jobs here, we should make that easier for them. it is a big debate around a lot of issues. we look forward to working with the administration and congress on that. >> the states have had different reactions to health care reform. some are in the process of forming their own insurance exchanges. other states are leaving it up to the federal government. he proudly each have different perspectives on it. is health reform going to work in 2014 given the responses on the state level to it? >> i know we each address it. i will start. devastates are taking a different approach. one has to do -- different states are taking a different approach. in delaware, we decided to to a state federal partnership after a significant concentration -- consultation. number two, the issue was do we expand medicaid. this was an issue of math. we believe it is a good lesson for us to make sure more people covered through this expansion while at the same time, the federal reimbursement for medicaid increases. number three, t
telling to your member of congress. >> two other things. on the department of education side think they will work on the mess, and hope we do a better job with the servicers reining in the problems. it is important that they have it is important that they have been hearing about this problem so much. that is one thing that does not require congressional action. another thing is the consumer financial protection bureau is sort of the new game in town as far as this goes. people do not think of them as a federal student loan side, they primarily have jurisdiction over private student loans. there will be quite active, talking about some of the predatory practices, but even on the federal student loan side the consumer financial protection bureau has jurisdiction over debt collectors and some of the servicers. it is not the biggest picture issues we have been talking about so much, but on the ground for people right now who have already borrowed, clients like mine having the existing programs that work well, it is incredibly important. hopefully a lot is going to happen in that area.
board does, sharing high quality courses that are designed and built upon and refined through educators working together. >> i want to separate these four second. i could not agree with you more that brilliant minds helped shape a common core. as opposed to the construction -- >> it was a combination of mathematicians and educators. if you're making turf courses -- >> we have teacher preparation programs across the country. many of them not the kinds of institutions for which people are recruited. we're trying to get these programs to overhaul what they do. i understand the value of trying to share practices. i am curious. are there other ways to help change what is going on? >> let me pause and celebrate your candor in the following sense. this is the time in a time of limited resources to step out. when people ask what more resources to need to implement it worries me as a question in the sense that we have to learn how to redirect and be more efficient and to get an edge of the few things these standards are asking us to do. i am saying you're right. as a system, producing productive
, education, and leadership. our president is one of the co-chairs of the council. it is my great pleasure to introduce him this evening. he is a scholar, advocate, and a true friend of afghanistan. pls -- [applause] >> thank you very much for that introduction and your work as vice chair of the u.s. afghan women's council. i wish to thank the members from the delegation from afghanistan, u.s. afghan women's council and all of our guests from around the world for joining us this evening. it is a privilege to welcome back to georgetown the president of afghanistan hamid karzai. we look forward to hearing his remark on afghanistan beyond 2014, a perspective on afghan-u.s. relations. 2014 will be an historic year for afghanistan as it will witness elections across the country and the end of u.s. and isaf combat operations. as president obama, secretary of state clinton and many of this room have emphasized this transition provides us with the opportunity for diplomatic and cultural relations between our peoples. at georgetown, we are proud to be a part of this critical work notably through th
find more places to cut spending without short-changing things like education, job training, research and technology all of which is critical. spending cuts must be balanced with more reforms to our tax code. the wealthiest individuals and the biggest corporations should not be able to take advantage of loopholes that are not available to most americans. as i said earlier, one thing i won't compromise over is whether or not congress should pay the tab for a bill they have already racked up. congress refused to give the united states the money to pay the bill on time the consequences could be catastrophic. our familieses and our businesses account no afford that dangerous game again. i congratulation the newly sworn members of congress and i look forward working with the new congress in a bipartisan way. if we focus on the interest of our country above the interest of our party i'm convinced we can cut spending and we can protect the middle class. we can step up to meet the important business that awaits us this year, creating jobs, fixing our infrastructure and our immigration system.
transportation to education, to preserving the capabilities of our national guard. while each governor has his or her own unique circumstances, we all have to facilitate job growth, improve schools, and be financially responsible. as much as we do in our states, our economies are tightly linked to the national economy, and as a result, our state's prosperity, the prosperity of our citizen depends in no small measure on the ability of all public servants in washington to come together on a path forward. uncertainty here in federal support hurts both our economies and the federal budget, and the implications are incredibly important. governors have been working with the president, the vice president, and congressional leadership to find solutions to help put our country back on firm financial footing. one of the largest elements of the uncertainty concerned elements of the fiscal cliff that were either postponed or taken out of the reason -- recent relief act of 2012 as the only postponed reducing grants to states. intimate reform was not addressed, and no action was taken regarding the federal
and replenish our beaches. our department of education has worked night and day to get schools reopened right away, and where that wasn't possible, to get them restored by the next school year, all while maintaining our commitment to a full 180-day school year of education for our kids. executive order 107 makes sure that when insurance payments do come, they are not compromised by excessive deductibles and ensures that our citizens maximize their reimbursement. while there are dozens of other examples of the never quit attitude of this administration and our citizens, there is none better than the miracle of route 35 in mantoloking. at the mantoloking bridge, route 35 had been completely washed away by sandy. i stood at the spot where the atlantic ocean flowed into the bay where route 35 once carried thousands of cars a day to vacations down the shore. within days, commissioner jim simpson, the department of transportation and our private sector partners had a temporary road built to allow emergency vehicles onto the island. now, merely 10 weeks after our state's worst storm, you see a perma
-ups, we are taking steps to make sure conn leads again. when it came to education, the stakes were clear. take action together or risk losing an entire generation of young people to failing schools and a widening achievement gap. i am proud that after a long and hard debate, we were able to say with one voice, that the status quo was no locker acceptable. that when it comes to public education, we cannot keep doing what we have always done and simply hope for better results. that our kids cannot afford it and our state cannot afford it as well. we work with an eye towards a future and have made an historic investment of nearly $100 million from three k to high- school, focusing on those districts that are most in need. reaching kids early is critical to the success and early childhood education had to be a central portion of our education reform. so we created 1000 new school readiness opens statewide for youngsters at a time when no one thought that it was possible. that is 1000 more children that will show up to kindergarten this fall ready to learn. we did that together, and we will d
not addressing the costs of education at all. it is about increasing government funding to help students go to school. we need to be focusing on and we need to be focusing on what are the costs that can be reduced to bring these costs down, make schools more competitive, so students have a competitive choice of which university to go to. >> we will let you go, as we hear from traunch mitchell. -- josh mitchell. >> a lot of schools are starting to increase things at a faster pace. i think there is so much scrutiny these days. it is kind of like health care. why are costs rising? i think they're going to start to see a lot of pressure from congress to rein in their costs. >> josh mitchell writes for "the wall street journal," and thanks for spending the last half hour with us. >> yes. >> and we appreciate all of your phone calls, comments on twitter, and the conversation continues online, and the question we have been asking is, how much debt is worth going into college? [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013
perspectives on all sorts of issues including economics, education, the environment. i think you'll see a lot of different thoughts and ideas on how to get things done and how to find compromise. host: how does a play out with women in leadership roles? guest: we have a new number of women serving on committees and shares. barbara mikulski is the first women's chair of the appropriations committee. how that will change, we will see. we have more and more -- patty murray, dianne feinstein. these are significant changes. very interesting on the house side. we have seven women ranking on major committees and the house. the house republicans have zero women cheering any major committees. they are all white men and have one woman chairing a minor committee and that is the administration committee. we feel we are in a great place. froml see a lot of work emily's list to get the majority of back in the house. host: what role did your organization plate in the election of these women? guest: we are in it for the long haul. emily's list has been working with some women since they were in the state leg
advisory commission, comprised of experts in mental health, education, law enforcement, and first response. we may never know what motivated the events at sandy hook elementary, but that won't stop us from working to prevent future tragedy. over the coming months, the commission will come together to make specific, actionable recommendations in the areas of school safety, mental health services, and gun violence prevention. this session, i know there will be others that take action on these issues, and i applaud those efforts. the more resources we can bring to bear on this issue, the better. working together we can and will affect real change. there are some things we know already. we know that we must find ways to better respond to those with mental health needs. as a society, we have an obligation to take action in a meaningful way when a person seeks our help or demonstrates a need for it. we must balance our respect for individual rights with our obligation to provide for the greater public safety. and when it comes to preventing future acts of violence in our schools, let me say this
was an administrator in north carolina and was the national alliance of black school educators superintendent of the year. we have elizabeth celania-fagen -- liz fagen, douglas county superintendent of schools. she was superintendent of tucson unified. a beacon of education reform by arne duncan. david coleman, president of the college board. he co-founded student achievement partners. he was recognized as one of 11 education act of this. he was new school change agent of the year. he has set a high bar. always a mistake. john deasy, los angeles unified superintendent of schools, second largest system in the country. he was deputy director of education for the bill and melinda gates foundation. he is remembered as the hard- charging superintendent of the prince george's county schools. we have joanne weiss, chief of duncan. army duncane she ran the race to the top program, getting that off to a widely heralded start. ceo at the new schools venture fund. let's get this started. lost angeles is wrestling with a number of challenges. there are concerns about the reform. of where does it intersec
resources. it means fighting in the areas of education for the population so that they can work with determination to make their contribution to rebuilding their respective economies. success knows no frontiers. my term of office will be dedicated, among other things, to getting haitians into the schools, to keeping up the fight against corruption, to establishing the rule of law, and my hope and trust is that the results will, within less than two years. more than 1 million children who read and loved by the wayside now have free access to education. -- who were left by the wayside now have free access to education. the effort for reconstruction is already paying off. more than 1 million homeless people finding accommodation, and part of these benefits have come from taxpayers. i say to them that all of our strategies and their solidarity has not been wasted. those that are most formidable are the ones that have benefited the most. -- most vulnerable are the ones then have benefited the most. there is taking shape in front of our eyes that the institutions have been filled. the
mentioned. perhaps better voter education about the tools that are out there to help them know where they need to vote, more staffing at the polling places where a captain or assistant captain could actually go through the front lines, the czech and lines to interface with the voters, say has anyone -- checkin lines to interface with the voters, say has anyone got any questions? i can check for you. that has become a real issue with all of the precincts. so come up voter education might be part of it, and i think early voting has law lot of voters into thinking "i can vote anywhere." and the only races they care about will be counted and in some cases the lower level races, they may be upset about. but it is like a shrug it for them and they say, oh, well. i think some of the lower races, some of the ballot initiatives, the more localized issues -- there might be a real problem in the end. so. >> thank you. i have a few things that have been touched on by almost everybody here. just to the voters, about being prepared. i know in arlington county, you can go on the web site. it tells
of the time. we need to do everything we've been doing with the economy, education, etc. we also need to address the plague and scourge of gun violence. we need to address hurricane sandy. so, yes, it is an aggressive agenda. it is a lot of work. but they elect us to lead, my friends. we will. they elect us to perform and we will. we have proven that we can lead. we have proven that we can perform. we know that with these challenges at hand that is exactly what we must now do. we have daunting challenges. no doubt. but these challenges also pose exciting opportunities. yes, it is hard to reform education. i know the politics of it. i know the problems, i know the issues. but, can you imagine how smart this state would be when we actually educate all our children to the best of the god given potential. when every black child and every white child and every urban child is educated to their full potential. i know helping the economy is hard. i know it has been decades of decline. can you imagine how successful our economy is going to be when that upstate economic engine is running at ful
is how does it treats its women. does it educate that half of the population? does it give an opportunity? when it does, you will police the power of everyone, -- you unleash the power of everyone, not just some, and there was great wisdom in afghanistan ratifying a constitution that recognizes that appeared that should be part of the legacy of these last 10 years. thank you very much, everybody. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> also this afternoon, vice president biden continuing his meetings today comeuppance together a response to last month's shootings at the connecticut elementary school. he is meeting this afternoon with representatives of the video game industry. he said yesterday he will have recommendations to the president next week. we want to hear again from hamas karzai this afternoon. he will be at georgetown university talking about the future of u.s.-afghan relations. that is live at 5:30 eastern on cnn. u.s. army colonel michael meese spoke earlier this week about kevin terrorism. he is a f
incorporate themselves into the whole education process, because they don't have the ability to maximize all the education they're receiving because they can't go to college or they feel like they can't do this because they don't have a social security card or can't apply for financial aid. it seems like, i'm going to go to work in a few minutes, and a lot of my kids are going to learn what i'm going to teach today and they won't feel like they can do anything with it. host: has it changed since the -- since president obama announced this defered deportation -- >> caller: i have a few -- a lot of the kids i teach aren't old enough yesterday to apply for the document. i teach middle school, but a lot of them are looking at the document as a way to get around that. but it's just the fact that, you know, we have people that i hear every day, and, you know, they were brought here -- everybody was brought here, you know what i mean? it just doesn't seem like we should be able to find a way to fully incorporate them. you know, just find a way to make them citizens just like and you myself and we c
of equality in a just society and a rational choice. she also works on ethics and at the -- in education. she is co-editor of the forthcoming collection, occupy the future. he is a graduate of mit and an early participant in occupy washington -- occupy boston. he specializes in web applications and design. a co-founder in danger of some in cambridge. -- actually, just in central square. if he continues to be engaged in outspoken protests, malfeasance, and a finance industry mismanagement. and next is phil thompson. actually, he is on the end. an associate professor. i'm giving their introductions in the order there will speak. he is a professor at the mit department of urban studies. he is an urban planner and political scientist. -- the deputy manager of the new york housing authority. he is a frequent adviser to trade unions and their efforts to work with immigrants and community groups across the united states. he is the author of a double trouble, black mayors, black communities, and the struggle for democracy. if he is writing a book on community building and development since the 1960's
, technology, engineering and energy, that we educate and prepare our young people for the opportunities of tomorrow, and when we "make it in america" all of america's families can make it in america. [applause] the strength of our democracy also demands that we restore the confidence of the american people in our political process. we must empower the voters, we must remove obstacles of participation in our democracy for all americans. we must increase the level of civility and reduce the role of money in our elections. when we do, when we do we will elect more women, more minorities, more young people to public office and that's a good thing. the american people are what make our country great. by and large the united states is a nation of immigrants -- built, enriched, and strengthened by men, women, and children who share our patriotism and seek the american dream. the strength of our democracy will be advanced by bold action for comprehensive immigration reform. today, we take an oath to protect and defend our constitution, our people, and our freedom. to protect and defend -- that
, they must be skilled enough, it educated, and they must get the best rules we can offer them. let's choose those tools. i would say the remote control system on their part of the invention provided that we can control it, if we can control the ethics, which we will discuss later. these men and women or force multipliers now. they rely on information. everything relies on information. that is a key enabler. we collect everywhere in the world gigabytes of information. we have to assess them and use them and improve them and share them. as we come into the information spear, they must take into account not only the data in the systems, but the users and the providers. this is the link between the two key enablers. users are the skilled people who are able to use the information and understand it and put it back into a context and to transform information into intelligence. transform information into the action required. if only we mastered information, we can properly inform the decision-making process and accelerate operations, and increase our effectiveness magically. -- dramatically. this
and at the -- in education. she is co-editor of the forthcoming collection, occupy the future. he is a graduate of mit and an early participant in occupy washington -- occupy boston. he specializes in web applications and design. a co-founder in danger of some -- danger awesome in cambridge. -- actually, just in central square. if he continues to be engaged in outspoken protests, malfeasance, and a finance industry mismanagement. and next is phil thompson. actually, he is on the end. an associate professor. i'm giving their introductions in the order there will speak. ey will speak. he is a professor at the mit department of urban studies. he is an urban planner and political scientist. -- the deputy manager of the new york housing authority. he is a frequent adviser to trade unions and their efforts to work with immigrants and community groups across the united states. he is the author of a double trouble, black mayors, black communities, and the struggle for democracy. if he is writing a book on community building and development since the 1960's. finally, chris was awarded a pulitzer prize in 2002
our beaches. the department of education has worked night and day to give schools -- to get schools reopened as quickly as possible, and where not possible, to get them restored by the next school year, while maintaining our commitment to full 180-day school year of education for all of new jersey's children. executive order one of the seven says when interest payments, they are not compromised by excessive deductibles, and will ensure citizens maximize their reimbursements from companies. while there are dozens of other examples of the never quit attitude of this administration and our citizens, there is none better than the merkel of route 45 in manalocee. the bridge had been completely washed away. i stood at the spot where the atlantic ocean flow into the bay, and once carried thousands of cars of days to vacationers down the shore. within days, the commissioner, the department of transportation, and our private sector partners and had a temporary road built to allow mercy vehicles onto the island. now nearly 10 weeks after the storm, you see a permanent route 35 already been re
's in deciding between safety and education, we need women to really getting gauged in politics. truthfully, we need them to run for office. many more and more women to run for office. one of the big focuses over the next many years is to get more women to run for legislature, city council. that is our pipeline to congress. it is also the regulations and laws being passed everyday affecting our lives and the lives of our family. >> questions? >> i am kathryn lewis, a freelance journalist for "the new york times" and others. as a follow-up to a leash's question, i have seen coverage that women are no longer this block that politicians can expect to appeal to with one set of issues and you can no longer count on women to just vote on specific issues. can you address that question and the challenge for you and in general for viewing women as a monolithic voting bloc? >> i always thought that it was odd that we thought they were one issue voters to begin with. 51% of the population? women are very different in that population. what i think is really important here is that there are key economic pri
not tighten up our infrastructure, our education. we are 25th in math. it is unreal. where do they think we will grow if we have nothing to show? we have idiots in congress. there is more greek than anything else. host: you mentioned the republican position on future taxes. here is what the washington post says -- this is from abc's this week with george stephanopoulos. --nator mcconnell said jen, maryland, democrat. what do you think about tidying spending to a debt limit increase? caller: i do not think we have the correct information to make that decision. the us government does not have a rational accounting system. if we buy a house, we fund it with debt over time. we borrow. in the us, if we build a road, we pay out-of-pocket cash. we have an accounting system that treated infrastructure and associated the cost of that with the debt. where are we? are we spending current s?penses >> we do not kno we do not know. host: do you think that is likely to happen? what would you do? what would you practically do to change things? caller: i would try to get that type of accounting system in pl
business. that is a host of examples where i do not think it is that difficult to talk to and educate people. >> you look like you were about to jump in. >> i was going to say that my starting point is where people are. it may be that civil rights organizations are spent forces. and maybe that trinity based organizations are narrow minded and to anxious to get the income grants and to build five units of housing. that is not going to change the system. that is where people are. for the last four years i've been working with the building trades. i have been working with them to the young black and latino kids of color into the building trade so they can become the workers. as conservative as they are, that operate 1200 job training centers in the construction grade. it is the second-largest job training mechanism outside the u.s.. guess what? there in a coalition filled with many other organizations that train high-school dropouts working together for the last four years to say "how do we change, how do we improve?" the national leadership has gone across 350 cities in u.s.. try to con
an american citizen. >> i became a u.s. citizen in 2001. >> you were educated at harvard and yale and johns hopkins. >> i have a m.a. and ph.d from harvard in history. >> george shultz was secretary of treasury and secretary of state -- in the nixon administration he was secretary of treasury. here he is. >> he came to me and said, john dean has just brought me a list of 50 people and wants a full investigation of them. that is a very unpleasant thing to have happen to you. what should i do? i said, do not do it. he said, what shall i tell john dean if he asks me how it is going? tell him if he has a problem he has to go to me. in the tapes there is discussion between the president and john dean about who do i think i am. but it was an improper use of the irs, and i would not do it. >> did you speak to the president about this? >> he never brought it up. >> this is really important. the private library made the argument -- and this is an argument school kids absorb -- that all presidents break the law and the difference is that richard nixon got caught. i felt that this was a terrible lesso
in education and infrastructure that help our economy grow. keep in mind that the threat of tax heights going up is only one part of this so-called fiscal cliff. what we also have facing us starting tomorrow or automatic spending cuts that are scheduled to go into effect. keep in mind that some of these spending cuts that congress has said will automatically go into effect have an impact on our defense department but that also have an impact on things like head start. there are some programs that are scheduled to be cut. we are using an ax instead of a scalpel. it may not always be the smartest cuts. that is a piece of business that still has to be taken care of. i want to make clear that any agreement we have to deal with these automatic spending cuts, those also have to be balanced. my principle has always been to do things in a balanced, responsible way and that means revenues as to be part of the equation in turning off the sequester as well as spending cuts. the same is true for any future deficit agreement. we will have to do more to reduce our debt and deficit. i am willing to do more
and democratization and education. do you have a strategy how to audit the effectiveness of those investments? >> we do. we produced, under my watch, the first joint strategy for doing audits and investigations in that area in afghanistan with the aidag, dodag, and the state ag. it lays out a strategy where we're focusing on the most important programs by dollar amounts and impact on our mission. it is a 50-page strategy but we do have a strategy. it was not until i showed up that we had a joint strategy. we have been spending money there for eight years-10 years before but no one had come up with a joint strategy as to how we tout -- target for audits. yes, sir, in the way back? >> initially in terms of reconstruction in afghanistan, you outlined a bleak situation. what do you think it takes to improve that situation and what role does your office play in that? of all the problems to outline, what specific agencies do you hold responsible for those issues? >> i don't hold any particular agency responsible. security is an issue. corruption is an issue. i think every agency in the u.s. government has
an accidental erasure. there are too many starts and stops. it sounds to the educated year as if this has been the race eight times. -- erased eight times. someone in camp david or elsewhere erased it. i often wondered if it wasn't one person -- >> was? >> his dear friend and totally deniable. >> if the audience is frustrated by these little clips, the whole interviews are available on our website and the archive and the nixon library. >> you cann get them at nixonlibrary.gov. >> the interview -- where did you do it? >> the library. one of the things, if you watch these, there is the story of the role woodward and bernstein played. the role the house played and the senate played. the prosecutors, his army of prosecutors. do not forget the role played by republicans in the nixon administration. he was one of them -- he was not alone. we would hear from a few more. >> here he is -- he was at the time? >> deputy attorney general of the united states. >> it was clear he was not going to carry out that order. he turned to me and said, what are you going to do? i told him -- i do not think it is clo
with ideas. how we present things they talk about around the table and talk about educational institutions, likewise they talk about in the field of play that is fair and good and makes this country even stronger. i'm delighted that we've done that today. i appreciate the gentlewoman from rochester for her vigorous analysis today what we need to do looking forward. i'll continue to listen to that and i know the gentle lady will be on the rules committee and i look forward to that service that she will be making. with great enthusiasm, we will move forward in this new congress. madam i yield back the balance of my time. >> the 113th congress convened yesterday. on today's "washington journal," we'll talk about two senators will the legislative agenda for the new congress. republican senator john hoeven of north dakota and then maine senator angus king. also today, the government releases the unemployment report for november. we'll talk about the unemployment numbers and what they mean for the economy with marilyn geewax of npr. >> it's quite true that a people history is the result of how
places to cut spending without short changing things like education, job training, research and technology, all of which are critical to our prosperity to a 21st century economy. but spending cuts must be balanced with more reforms to our tax code. the wealthiest individuals tand biggest corporations shouldn't be able to take advantage of loopholes and deductions that aren't available to most americans. as i said earlier this week one thing i will not compromise over is whether or not congress should pay the tab for a bill they've already racked up. if congress refuses to give the united states the ability to pay the bills on time the consequence force the entire global economy could be catastrophic. last time congress threat bd this course of action our entire economy suffered for it. our families and our businesses connot afford that dangerous game again. i congratulate the newly sworn in members of congress and i look forward to working with the new congress in a bipartisan way. if we focus on the interest of our country boof the interest of party i'm convinced we can cut
to the educated ear as if this had been erased eight times. so somebody, either in camp david or key biscayne erased it. i often wondered if it was beeby robozo. >> who was? >> richard nixon's dear friend and totally deniable. >> to our audience, if they're frustrated by just these little clips, the whole interviews are available on our website, our video library and a lot of them in the nixon library. >> you can get them at www.nixon-library dot goff. >> william luckles house, did you do that interview? >> sure. i remember it. it was at the library. one of the things -- if you watch these, there is a story of course in the role woodward and bernstein played, very important in baregate and the role the house played and senate played and the prosecutors and cox and his army of prosecutors. don't forget the role played by republicans within the nixon administration who said no. and luckleshouse is one of them. he's not alone and we'll hear from a few of them. >> here is william ruckleshouse. who is number two? >> the secretary-general of the united states. [video clip] >> it was clear he wasn't
back. the data coming from mckinsey around education. the student visas. you get it one year after period to work in the united states. many% had back immediately after they get their degrees from here. you might say that is anecdotal. let's think about the united states. this is something i heard last week. stephen breyer -- i will recommend you get his book. "making democracy work." the united states survived over a century without having the universal suffrage in the way that we live today. the u.s. constitution was written in 1787. it was clearly are ticketed -- it was clearly articulated. it took the united states until 1956 before you had universal suffrage and a fairness in this country. it was impossible to build institutions and to have sustainable growth that has propelled the world to new levels of income levels and so on without having a democratic society in the way that we know it today. i think we need more patience. they are having discussions in china around this. the question is about implementation. they say, we get it. we know we need democracy. how do we implem
there are barriers for women to move into these corporals or into these law firms? do we have an education system supporting women in this process? it comes down to how we are supporting the family structure. that is often what it comes down to. and that is a question for more and more men today. you think about men who are on the part of track and women who are on this mommy track. -- men who are on this partner track and women who are on this mommy track. i know more and more men who want to go coach soccer at night. host: there is a story in psychology today in january talk about women voting and the psychology behind it. part of the information was the data behind the pilot test. guest: it is tough. we just did some research this post-election. there has always been a sense that women will vote for women. women will vote for women if they really see that woman in a way that she is accomplished, viable, and have the same belief system. it is more likely women will vote for democrats first. and there is an 18-point gender gap in the presidential alexian. and it went to president obama. -- in th
, to engage and educate them and remind them that the party dynamic is not positive for any of us. >> it looks like you are about to jump in. >> i was just going to say that my starting point is where people are. maybe that labor is a spent force. it may be that civil rights organizations are spent forces. maybe that community-based organizations are now reminded into anxious to just get up foundation grant or a government no income tax credit to build five units of housing, and that is not going to change the system. but that is where people are. and that is where i start. for the last four years, i have been working with the widest, most conservative part of the labor movement. i have been working with them to try to get young black and latino kids of color into the building trades so they can become the green work force of the future. the building trades, spent as they are, conservative as they are, operate 1200 job training centers in the construction trades and it is the second-largest job-training mechanism outside of the u.s. navy. and guess what? they are actually in a coalition with y
. i believe we can find more places to cut spending without shortchanging things like education, research, and technology, all of which are critical to our prosperity in the 21st century economy. spending cuts must be balanced with more reforms to our tax code. the wealthiest individuals and the biggest corporations should not be able to take advantage of loopholes and deductions that are not available for most americans. one thing i will not compromise over is whether or not congress should pay the tab they have racked up. if congress refuses to give united states the ability to pay its bills on time, consequences for the entire global economy could be catastrophic. the last of congress threatened this course of action, our entire economy suffered. i congratulate the newly sworn in members of congress. i look forward to working with the new congress and a bipartisan way. if we focus on the interests of our country above the interests of the party, am convinced we can cut spending and raise revenue in a manner that reduces our deficit and protect the middle class. and we can ste
into education, too. i recommend all of the listeners take a look. the guy won the academy award for best documentary. instead of saying thank you to the academy, the first thing he said was, i want to tell everybody that not one of these bankers is in jail. host: what is your concern about having experience on wall street and coming into a government position? caller: i think it is a transfer of wealth. one of the callers mentioned he did a really good job. you asked a good job for two, and he said his buddies on wall street. look at the banker bailouts that we have had. henry paulson, even in the elections when congress voted it down the first time, the banker bail out the last month or so of george bush's administration. obama and mccain came off of the campaign trails. they got on the phone and they got the congressional black caucus to change their votes and twist some arms and it passed and obama became president. i announcing that is why he became president, but you have to look at where the money is coming from. host: he is asking questions about jack lew, the next secretary of tr
and bear arms. advancing the shooting sports. championing gun safety, education and training. creating a vital legacy by answering freedom's call. and we are growing stronger every day. we are the n.r.a. and the n.r.a. is you. host: that is from the n.r.a. two stories you can find online and front page of the leading newspapers. "new york times" looking at symbols of grief piling up. from the "washington post" broad strategy on guns being weighed far beyond the ban on assault weapons. they are on their websites. we will continue the conversation on the agenda ahead as lawmakers return the start of the 113th congress. president back in washington later t today. later, looking at just what members of congress earn, pensions and salary. we will have more with daniel shuman of the sunlight foundation. keeping track of other programs. good morning, nancy. >> good morning, steve. on today's shows the fallout from the fiscal cliff a look at the second term in office. all five re-air on c-span radio with nbc's "meet the press." today's the guests include mitch mcconnell, former republican sena
in an educated way. this is where we look at our responsibility. it tells them navigate that decision. it is a personal and hard decision. we are believers that hospice is the right way to do. >> you take it from a cost discussion? >> quality of life discussion. when you make that the cost will bear out here i o. >> by understand it is to bring down the cost of the entire health-care system. >> to probably answering the question. >> the devil is in the details. he was going to be making these decisions as to whether care is provided or not? it was not so long ago that we had to go to a primary-care doctor to get permission to go to a specialist. is it a primary care doctor? is an insurance company? who makes the financial decisions acts that is really what is going to drive the whole thing. >> i will give you our perspective. our perspective is the physician is at the center of health care. we believe the physician is where that decision is made. we do not believe it is a hospital. we believe it is the physician that makes that decision. we do have a bias to primary care. we believe i
it was too much of a headache. there is much to be done to educate the older generation of publishers to understand that they will have to engage on every level with their audiences in the next phase. >> my name is jeff roberts, former broadcast journalist. winston churchill famously said democracy is the worst possible form of government. i am curious what country you think might be doing a better job in disseminating news through the mass media where it is not as hysterical, not as pointed as our news coverage is. does anybody do it better, or is this just the way it is in free society? i hope you don't say great britain. >> i think this is the way it is. if you go to europe, you will find that they did not seem to go through this golden age. the big newspapers there are not owned by parties, they are affiliated with parties in their ideology. the editorial page and the news pages will work together to report stories, where you are we have this great fire wall between the editorial pages and the news pages. i do think this is the worst possible media except for all the others. >> so
be educational. he said that half of the world would be destroyed. that is a crazy and messy comment and yet, what we learned was that it could be contained and deterred. pakistan fought a war every 15 years, three wars in 30 years. then they got nuclear weapons and in the last 40 years they have not fought a war since. every time you will of course see tensions and crisis because these powers are in conflict with one another. but what is extraordinary during the cold war, despite the intense political rivalry that all history would suggest that soviet union would go toward but they didn't because of the nuclear weapons margaret thatcher understood this. she gave a speech and she said you and i secretary general know the conventional weapons have never deterred war in europe. but nuclear weapons have don so for 40 years she said that in 1989. north korea, when they went nuclear, all other countries would go nuclear, japan would go nuclear. south korea is at war with north korea. japan hasn't gone nuclear. the lesson of north korea is if our third-rate dysfunctional country that mansions to a
it is that difficult to talk to people, educate people, and remind them that the two-party dynamic is within the party, the way the decisions are made and leaders are promoted. >> you look like you were about to jump in. >> my starting point is where people are. it may be that labor is a spent force and that civil-rights organizations are spent forces and the community-based organizations are narrow minded and too anxious to just get a foundation grant for government low-income tax credit to build five units of housing and it will not change the system, but that is where people are. for the last four years i have been working with the building insurance, the widest part of the labor movement. i have been working with them to try and get a young black and latino kids of color into the building trade so that they can become the green work force of the future. the building trade, conservative as they are, operates 1200 job training centers in the construction trade and is the second-largest mechanism outside the navy. guess what? they are actually in a coalition with youth bills, with many other organiza
california, the ranking member of the committee on education. >> the gentleman is recognized. >> i thank the gentlewoman for recognition. i rise in favor of the motion to commit i will be offering with mr. cliburn before the house later today so that we can take the small but very important step to provide the right of every american to vote. i was appalled in the past election by widespread reports across the country of voters forced to wait an hours-long line simply to exercise one of our most fundamental rights, the right to vote. even in some states with early voting, they were forced to choose between waiting for hours or missing work and taking care of their children to cast their vote, or giving up their right to vote altogether. some precincts with the miami, hundreds of voters stood in line for hours, past the closing time of the polls. even after president obama declared -- was declared the winner of the election. it offends our basic values that americans would be denied the right to vote because of last-minute illness or change in the work schedule or any to pick up a child f
of education and specialization, those tend to be going begging. there are opportunities there. it takes a lot of schooling an effort to get yourself where you're in position to take those jobs. -- and effort to get yourself where you're in a position to take those jobs. if you want to be a waitress, you can probably find a job. if you want to be a brain surgeon, you can probably find a job. if you want to be an aircraft mechanic making $38 an hour, that can be a lot tougher. there is one thing that is helping with that, this energy resurgence. we're seeing an awful lot of energy jobs being created because of this process the people referred to as a fracking. and conventional means of extracting oil and gas. -- unconvential means of extracting oil and gas. another area that is doing pretty well is spinoffs from agriculture. if we have a somewhat normal year in terms of whetheather ths agricultureverage purchase o sector. there are some points of hope within that structure is generally true that the low- paying jobs -- structure. it is generally true that low- paying jobs and high-paying jobs a
paid more, but they thought it was too much of a headache. there is much to be done to educate the older generation of publishers to understand that they will have to engage on every level with their audiences in the next phase. >> my name is jeff roberts, former broadcast journalist. winston churchill famously said democracy is the worst possible form of government. i am curious what country you think might be doing a better job in disseminating news through the mass media where it is not as hysterical, not as pointed as our news coverage is. does anybody do it better, or is this just the way it is in free society? i hope you don't say great britain. >> i think this is the way it is. if you go to europe, you will find that they did not seem to go through this golden age. the big newspapers there are not owned by parties, they are affiliated with parties in their ideology. the editorial page and the news pages will work together to report stories, where you are we have this great fire wall between the editorial pages and the news pages. i do think this is the worst possible med
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)